Form and genre: planning and meandering- an IWSG post #IWSG

This post is part of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group (IWSG), an inspiring blog hop for writers of all kinds. For more details go to the main sign-up page, and make sure to drop by a few blogs while you’re there.

The co-hosts for the August edition of the IWSG are Susan Baury Rouchard, Nancy Gideon, Jennifer Lane, Jennifer Hawes, Chemist Ken and Chrys Fey. Make sure you head over to see these guys and share some IWSG love!

Each month the IWSG posts a question that can be used in the next blog post, as a guide for sharing thoughts and advice to fellow writers. This month the question is:

Quote: “Although I have written a short story collection, the form found me and not the other way around. Don’t write short stories, novels or poems. Just write your truth and your stories will mould into the shapes they need to be.”
Have you ever written a piece that became a form, or even a genre, you hadn’t planned on writing in? Or do you choose a form/genre in advance?

Firstly, happy August everyone! I almost didn’t make it to this month’s IWSG post. The children are now in their summer holidays, which means I have very little time for things like this unless I get up earlier than everyone else and/or stay up later (I chose the former option for this one).

Image by croisy from Pixabay

At the moment, all signs are pointing towards a return to school in September, but at the back of my mind I’m preparing myself for more home schooling/home working/spending way too much time with my children and everything that comes with it all.

Now, to the question: It’s not often that the form I’m writing in has shaped itself into something else. When I’m writing a short story, for example, I’m very aware of the reduced word limit that I’m trying to stick to and the importance of still ticking all the beginning/middle/end boxes that make the story work. This means that I’m actively working to contain the story within the limits of the form. Different methods are used within short story writing to deliberately move the story on swiftly to keep the narrative flowing, and, although the same could be said for longer forms, they can be used slightly differently and over longer periods.

Now genre, that definitely does have a tendency to shape itself into something other than what I’d first intended. When I first started writing I’d usually begin a story with something in the sci-fi/fantasy genres (my favourite for reading and writing), but very quickly I noticed that other genres would creep in, most notably horror, psychological thriller and mystery. I was most surprised by the psychological thriller aspect, and it certainly wasn’t something that I’d ever thought I’d want or be able to write. It does make me wonder how much of a reflection it is on how my mind works!

So, how about you? Do you pre-plan your form and genre, or do you just let it flow right from the start and see where it takes you?

A secret writer trying to open up – an IWSG post #IWSG

This post is part of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group (IWSG), a wonderful blog hop for writers of all kinds; those new to writing, those who are old hands at it, those who do it full time and those who just write when they can. For more details go to the main sign-up page, and make sure to drop by a few blogs while you’re there.

The co-hosts for the June edition of the IWSG are Pat Garcia, J.Q. Rose and Natalie Aguirre. Make sure you head over to see these guys and share some IWSG love!

Each month the IWSG posts a question that can be used in the next blog post, as a guide for sharing thoughts and advice to fellow writers. This month the question is:

Writers have secrets! What are one or two of yours, something readers would never know from your work?

I’m not sure about my writerly secrets, but one thing that’s for sure is that I’ve kept my identity as a writer a secret from most people for a very long time. My reasons for this vary:

  1. I’ve never thought my writing good enough for me to earn the title of ‘writer’.
  2. I’ve not had the confidence to show my writing to more than a handful of people.
  3. My impostor syndrome prevents me from moving forward with my writing in any meaningful way for fear of being found out as a fraud.
  4. I worry that people will mock me and wonder how I could possibly think I’d be any good as a writer.
  5. I’m heading towards 40 and am now paranoid that I’ve left it too late to make any kind of success out of my writing.

I know I’m not alone in thinking these things about my writer self, which is one of the things I love about this online writer community. It’s a boost to be among like-minded people that I can bounce ideas off and spill all my worries to. Thank you for that, by the way.

And now that I’ve actually written these so-called ‘reasons’ down and removed them from my head space, I feel like I’m better able to tackle my insecurities and just get on with my writing.

After all, the bottom line is that I write for me; it’s something I enjoy and it gives me a sense of purpose and achievement. I’m sure that I will share my stories with more people at some point; in some ways it’s easier to send them out to people I don’t know (competitions, publications, etc.) than to have them read by people I do know.

A good first step for me towards this goal is sharing my words with you lovely folk, so thank you for reading my ramble.

How about you, do you have any writing secrets?

Getting back on the writing horse – an IWSG post #IWSG

This post is part of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group (IWSG), an awesome blog hop frequented by writers of all kinds; those new to writing, those who are more seasoned, those who do it full time and those who dip in and out. For more details go to the main sign-up page, and why not drop by a few blogs while you’re there. Make sure you’ve got plenty of time though, you could be there longer than you thought …

The awesome co-hosts for the May 6 posting of the IWSG are Feather Stone, Beverly Stowe McClure, Mary Aalgaard, Kim Lajevardi, and Chemist Ken. Make sure you head over to see these guys and share some IWSG love!

Each month the IWSG posts a question that can be used in the next blog post, as a guide for sharing thoughts and advice to fellow writers. This month the question on everyone’s lips blogs is:

Do you have any rituals that you use when you need help getting into the ZONE? Care to share?

So, it’s fair to say that I’ve been out of the writing zone for a very long time (my apologies if this isn’t news to some). The usual life milestones have wedged themselves firmly in the way, as well as work changes/challenges and other factors beyond my control.

But one good thing (and I like to dwell on the positives if I can) that has come out of this lock down situation is that I have a lot more time on my hands. Yes, things are equally, if not more, stressful at home with two children requiring homeschooling and working from home myself as well, but once the cherubs are in bed, I suddenly have more time for myself. I’m not having to head out for my mid-week darts match or run the children around to all their after-school stuff. And as for the weekends, all I really have on the to-do list is the weekly shop and a run around the block.

The first two or three weeks were tough as we adjusted to a new normal, but now things have settled a bit I want to use my time more productively, and that means getting back to writing. I’m trying to get myself back into a routine and make writing a habit again, something I plan into my day without having to think about it. I’ve been trying to free write for 15 minutes every day and so far I’m managing to do this three times a week. I’m hoping this will start stretching my writing muscles again so I can get back to writing like I used to.

How about you? Do you have any rituals you’d like to share? Any tips for me to help get back on that writing horse? I look forward to picking up some pointers.

Reminiscing and reaching out – an IWSG blog post #IWSG

This post is part of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group, an awesome blog hop frequented by writers of all kinds; those new to writing, those who are more seasoned, those who do it full time and those who dip in and out. For more details go to the main sign-up page, and why not drop by a few blogs while you’re there. Make sure you’ve got plenty of time though, you could be there longer than you thought …

The question posed for this month’s post is:

Has a single photo or work of art ever inspired a story? What was it and did you finish it?

A few years ago I used to take part in a blog hop called the ‘Writer Wednesday Blog Hop’. Each week one of the co-hosts would post a picture and a selection of random words and the aim was to write some flash fiction up to 500 words and post the following week.

I used to really enjoy this challenge, I found the picture and the choice of words would really focus my mind and get me concentrating on my writing.

I’ve just done a little Google search (as you do) and can’t seem to find anything more recent than 2015 for this blog hop, which is a real shame because it was a lot of fun, but I realise it was a long time ago and those bloggers have probably/possibly moved onto other writing adventures now.

Does anyone else remember this blog hop? Do these logos ring any bells?

    wwbh-badge-2

If anyone remembers this blog hop I’d love to hear whether you took part or just enjoyed reading the stories, and if you were one of the co-hosts then do get in touch. It was a lovely bunch of ladies that used to keep this going and it would be great to hear from you again. In fact, I’m pretty sure that Nicole Pyles over at The World of My Imagination is on the IWSG sign-up list … 

A new year, a new … (insert preference here) – an IWSG blog post #IWSG

This post is part of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group, an awesome blog hop frequented by writers of all kinds; those new to writing, those who are more seasoned, those who do it full time and those who dip in and out. For more details go to the main sign-up page, and why not drop by a few blogs while you’re there. Make sure you’ve got plenty of time though, you could be there longer than you thought …

The question posed for this month’s post is:

What started you on your writing journey?

The answer to this is something that I immediately thought was easy to come by, but the more I think about it the more elusive it is.

When I was at primary school, probably aged about 9/10 years old, we were tasked with writing an autobiography of sorts, in which I wrote that I wanted to be an author when I grew up. However, my studies veered away from English towards the sciences, mainly because I thought it would be easier to get a job in that area.

Throughout my teens and early adulthood I didn’t write anything, but my interest was sparked again when I returned to work after having my first daughter. My job changed slightly and I was assigned to work with someone different in a new department. We started talking about non-work related things (as you do) and it turned out that he also had an interest in writing and stories. We would bounce ideas off each other and even made a start on an outline for a joint venture, although it never really materialised into much.

It was definitely thanks to him that I started to put pen to paper, or rather hands to keyboard, and write stories of varying lengths. Now I’m sat here thinking about it, I realise this was actually ten years ago. Where has the time gone?!

Over that time my portfolio has grown very slowly and I’ve got more unfinished drafts than finished ones. Having my second daughter has definitely slowed things down, practically to a halt, but I try and free write for at least 15 minutes each day.

As we start a fresh new year, I’m filled with optimism and enthusiasm to kick-start my writing once again, and where better to start than with an IWSG blog post to ground myself and get my head in the right (write?) space? I’m reluctant to come up with specific New Year’s resolutions, but I would like to up my writing output over the next twelve months and maybe send out my stories to a place or two. Here’s hoping that by the end of the year the number of finished stories will outweigh the number of unfinished ones.

How did you get into writing?

What was your inspiration?

Have you set any goals for 2020?