Carrie Sorenson · Debb Stanton · Flash Fiction · Leanne Sype · Nicole Pyles · Tena Carr · Writer Wednesday Blog Hop

A difficult beginning – A WWBH post

This post is part of the Writer Wednesday Blog Hop, a weekly meme designed to inspire creativity and encourage the sharing of stories.

The hop is co-hosted by myself over at Reading, Writing and Everything in Between, Leanne Sype at Writings and Ruminations, Tena Carr at Jottings and Writings and Debb Stanton at Stanton Sunshine.

The challenge this week is to write a piece of flash fiction in up to 500 words, using two pictures as inspiration.

This weeks pictures:

2014-06-08 13.02.24 2014-06-19 18.23.46

 

This weeks story:

A difficult beginning

You look so tiny as you lie there, surrounded by so many tubes and wires. I’m afraid to put my hands on you in case I pull on something by mistake. You were this perfect little thing the day you arrived, and it breaks my heart that everything wasn’t quite right on the inside. The doctor says its no fault of ours, these things just happen sometimes, but still I feel like I’ve let you down already and you’re not even 48hrs old.

        I could sit here all day with you, watching you, hoping that being here will in some way help you get better. But I ache all over. I’ve still recovering too, my little one, from the efforts of bringing you into this world. We should both be at home right now, snuggled together and helping each other adjust and get strong again. But instead here we are, you in there and me as close as I can be. I know I need to be taking care of myself, to get some rest and recuperate, but that also means leaving you here by yourself.

        I know, of course, that you’re in the best place, getting the best care you can, but it’s not always the same as having the people who love you nearby.  And I have your sister to think of too. She needs me as much as you do, and I didn’t think I’d be splitting myself between the two of you so soon. You probably won’t remember any of this, or how much time I spent with you, but she will. She’ll notice if I’m here too much and if I’m not at home spending time with her too. I must get that right, I can’t have her being upset with either of us already. After all, this isn’t her fault. It isn’t anyone’s fault, it’s just something that happens, and this time it’s to us.

        We know you’re on the mend now, my little one, and big sister has been here and had her cuddles. She loves you more than you’ll ever know, and she’s been hurting as much as we have. She comes and holds your hand every day so you don’t forget her. The bunny in your cot was left for us yesterday, a parcel left on the doorstep, flowers too. Had things gone differently it would have been a harsh reminder of a tragedy impossible to bear, but instead now they are a symbol of hope that we’ll have you home soon.

Get well my little one, we have many adventures to all share together, today and forever xxx

Word count: 439

Carrie Sorenson · Debb Stanton · Flash Fiction · Leanne Sype · Nicole Pyles · Tena Carr · Writer Wednesday Blog Hop

Unknown Cargo – A WWBH post

This post is part of the Writer Wednesday Blog Hop, a weekly meme designed to inspire creativity and encourage sharing of stories.

The hop is co-hosted by myself over at Reading, Writing and Everything in Between, Leanne Sype at Writings and Ruminations, Tena Carr at Jottings and Writings and Debb Stanton at Stanton Sunshine.

The challenge this week is to write a piece of flash fiction in up to 500 words, using two pictures supplied by Tena as inspiration. Both pictures need to be incorporated into your story somewhere.

My story for this week:

Unknown Cargo

20140409-132433.jpg‘See you later scruff-ball!’ The cat didn’t even stir as I finished packing my lunch into my rucksack. Instead, he just gazed at me with those soppy blue eyes, probably wondering what craziness I was up to now. His eyes closed gently as I gave him one last fuss around the ears, and I could just see him getting comfortable in my spot as I headed out the door.

        The sun warmed my back as I cycled to the depot, a matter of only ten minutes at this time in the morning. Stashing my bag, I headed to the briefing room to see what runs I had, and to get in my early morning coffee at the same time. Not for the first time I wondered if it was the same coffee that me and the guys were trekking all over the country, but somehow I doubted it. The company was too cheap for that kind of blend. And I most certainly wasn’t drinking the stuff that I’d been hauling around for the past few weeks. I had no idea what it really was, they wouldn’t tell me no matter how many times I asked, all they said was that I wouldn’t want to drink it.

        As I headed out to my ride, the other boys passed me on their way in.

        ‘Starting early again, Jim?’ called Sam.

        ‘Have to,’ I said, ‘I’ve got a long way to go.’

        Slinging my gear across the seats I got myself settled in. This was the only truck I took out these days so it was all set up for me already. I plugged the tunes in and was ready to go.

cropped-121212153743.jpg

       I drove all day but still didn’t make it to my destination. Even with scheduled rest stops I still had to pull over and call it a night. All I could do was get up in good time in the morning and get going again. The bed was comfortable enough, and I managed a few good hours sleep before being woken up. There was no rain or wind to speak of, but still the whole lorry, cabin and all, began shaking loudly back and forth. Rubbing my eyes, I fumbled around for my torch but a bright light shining all around illuminated everything.

        Pulling on a jacket I tried to jump out, but the handle and door wouldn’t budge. Throwing my full weight against it I remained trapped, with only the window to squint out of to see what was happening. Hovering above, a large oval shape sat motionless with its lights shining down. Just as quickly the light went out, and the shape disappeared into the night sky in silence.

        I fell out of through the door which had now been released, sprawling me onto the lay-by. The only evidence that anything had happened was the fill level of the tank, now sitting at empty. More terrifying than what I’d just witnessed, was just how I was going to explain this to anyone.

Word count 502.

Carrie Sorenson · Debb Stanton · Flash Fiction · Leanne Sype · Nicole Pyles · Tena Carr · Writer Wednesday Blog Hop

Hidden in the storm – A WWBH post

This post is part of the Writer Wednesday Blog Hop, a weekly meme designed to inspire creativity and encourage sharing of stories.

The hop is co-hosted by myself over at Reading, Writing and Everything in Between, Leanne Sype at Writings and Ruminations, Tena Carr at Jottings and Writings and the newest member of our team, Debb Stanton at Stanton Sunshine.

The challenge this week is to write a piece of flash fiction in up to 500 words, using two pictures as inspiration.

This weeks pictures:

IMG_20140504_135821

IMG_20140420_162554

This weeks story:

Hidden in the storm

As the storm built overhead my appetite seemed lost, leaving me pushing my food around my bowl. It had been scorchingly hot, the fields dry, with barely enough water for the cattle.

        We hadn’t fared much better, the house  holding the heat and baking us as we slept. Even with windows open and fans on full, I still woke in the night dripping with sweat. Tonight had been forecast for rain though, and we felt it in the air as the rumbling grew in the distance.

        There hadn’t been a good storm for years. We’d spent two days strapping everything down that could be, locking things away, tying them to anything that was likely to hold itself in place. All we could do now was wait for it to arrive and ride it out as best we could.

        I knew it wasn’t just the wind and the rain that had everyone worried though. I’d not seen it myself, but there were stories of other things that came when the wind was high, when the storm distracted one and all. They weren’t to be fussed over in the broad light of the sun, but when the night fell, and the winds blew, they could terrify.

        I knew I’d need my energy if I was going to be up all night with the others, but I couldn’t bring myself to eat a thing. My stomach was churning and I didn’t trust it to keep anything down. I picked up my full bowl and took it to the sink where mother was standing, staring out the window. Following her gaze I could see the trees beginning to sway a little bit more, the leaves rustling loudly. The cattle were becoming restless in the barns, jostling against one another in the uncertainty. They could already sense that something was happening.

        I think mother knew too, her hands gripping the edges of the worktop until her knuckles started turning white. I couldn’t tell if it was through fear or determination, and I was too scared to ask. She lifted one hand at last and pointed out through the window. The storm was becoming more visible, even against the black of the night. The lightning flashes were frequent, lighting its way as it came. For a moment I couldn’t see what she saw, but as my eyes adjusted they became clearer in the black.

        I could only make out a few to begin with, dotted around the sky, flitting in and out of the storm clouds. I thought they must be birds but as the absurdity of this fact struck me I realised I didn’t know what they were, but I knew to be afraid. Their numbers grew as the cloud came closer, and on the wind I could hear their wailing and moaning. They were coming, whatever they were, and as I turned back to mother she was already moving.

        ‘They’re here,’ she said, without emotion. ‘Grab whatever you can and be ready to defend yourself.’

 

Word count: 501

 
Carrie Sorenson · Debb Stanton · Flash Fiction · Leanne Sype · Nicole Pyles · Tena Carr · Writer Wednesday Blog Hop

Surviving the night – A WWBH post

This post is part of the Writer Wednesday Blog Hop, a weekly meme designed to inspire creativity and encourage sharing of stories.

The hop is co-hosted by myself over at Reading, Writing and Everything in Between, Leanne Sype at Writings and Ruminations, Tena Carr at Jottings and Writings and the newest member of our team, Debb Stanton at Stanton Sunshine. Welcome to the team Debb!!!

The challenge this week is to write a piece of flash fiction in up to 500 words, using one picture and five random words as inspiration. All of these elements need to be incorporated into your story somewhere.

This weeks picture:

 

This weeks words:                            shout, sieve, degree, pile, planning.

 

This weeks story:

Surviving the night

I was alive. I had survived, when everything within me was convinced I wouldn’t be opening my eyes again in this world.

        I shifted my body weight and the stiffness in my legs protested. It didn’t stop there either, the discomfort traveling up my back to my shoulders in increasing degrees of pain. Sitting up, my skin responded to the coldness, making me shiver up and down. My fingers and toes ached as I tried to encourage some life into them, and I could see my breath surrounding me as I tried to use it to add heat into my hands.

         Some of the ache in my hands was from the cold I knew, but some of it was from gripping the ax handle too tightly as I’d waited for sleep to take me. The locked doors of the car would provide little protection, but grabbing the best weapon I could and getting myself hidden inside something was all the planning I’d had time for. I thanked my lucky stars again and again that I’d parked away from the buildings, hidden from view within the trees. It only went a small way to compensate for the complete failure of the engine to start, but I was glad for it now.

        My sleeve became damp as I wiped the condensation from the back window, and I peered through the morning mist looking for any kind of movement. The choice of location was much more remote than the last party, and I couldn’t help thinking now that the decision had been deliberate. In the middle of these fields, at least three miles from the nearest main road, you could shout your heart out and nobody would hear. And a lot of people had tried. What little I dreamed had all been filled with the shouts and screams of frightened, escaping people. All piled on top of each other trying to flee the barns, and only fueling the thirst of that which sought to devour them.

         All was quiet now though, the mist seeming to sieve out all the usual morning sounds. My stomach grumbled as I looked all around. If I tried the engine again it would draw attention in this silence, but I needed to get away and I wasn’t keen on making a break for it on foot. From what I saw of these things from last night, they certainly didn’t conform to any rules I knew of, which meant I wasn’t taking any chances.

         My heart pounded as one of the barn doors opened gently, the shadows from within coming forward into the light. There was no way to tell how many there could be in there. I was concentrating so much on trying to see them, I had no warning when the one hiding in the trees launched itself at the side of my car.

 
Word count: 477